Category Archives: PSHE

Self-respect

In Year 6, we have been discussing the term respect and what it means. We have also been looking at self-respect and how that links directly to our own happiness. The children started off discussing in pairs what respect means, before moving on to discussing the term self-respect. The children were then given two different coloured post-it notes and two different tasks. On the one, they had to write down or draw something they think they are good at, and on the other, they had to say something nice about their partner. We then spoke about how this made them feel and how when were are feeling negative we can get rid of those thoughts in various different ways.

Democracy

Year 6 discussed the term democracy in PSHE and as a class looked at what it meant. We then had an interesting discussion about whether the children thought they should be the age of 18 before being allowed to vote:

• No it should be 21 (Aflie)
• Yes 18 is right because it is when we become an adult (Tibet)
• Yes 18 is good because it is when you are mature enough to make a decision (Harley)
• I think it should be 16 because you can still be aware and understand what is happening (Oscar)

We then spoke about laws and why we have laws and rules in different circumstances.

Class Charter

In Year 6’s first PSHE lesson of the year they spent some time discussing the classroom and what it should be like. The children spent time discussing what atmosphere they would like their classroom to have, what basic rights people should have in a classroom and ways that they should behave within the classroom.

The children shared many ideas as a group and together decided that there were particular promises they could make to each other in order to make their classroom a welcoming place to be.

Research and design our own product

Year 6 have been looking at money over the last few weeks.

We looked at why we need money, how it can be earned and used for different jobs.

We then went on to research and design our own product. We looked at all the different specifications that needed to be considered:

► Size
► Function
► Materials
► Durability
► Cost
► Aesthetics
► Safety
► Target market
► Weight

All these are very important when thinking about making a new product.

The class had a lot of fun thinking about a variety of functions to put into their designs.

We had designs such as:
• A floating bed with some super features,LED lights, rocking motion and phone charger
• A smart watch that has a strap which changes with your heartbeat
• Boots that help you boost off the ground
• A jacket that keeps you heated in the winter and cool in the summer
• An advanced car
• And some others…

Here are some of the designs.

Debating drugs

Year 6 did an amazing job of finishing their debating on drugs.

They were exceptional in working in two large groups. The organised themselves, created an order and sorted main points.

It was impressive team work.

When the debating began, it was clear each side were out to win.

They were courteous while others spoke, stood up to counter argue a point and were well spoken.
The debate question was “Should we legalise all drugs.”

The “for” team had some excellent facts and definitely a lot of passion. Great facts-including the boy in the news who needed an illgal drug to manage his severe and chronic pain. He was denied it because it was illegal to use regardless of the fact that it was the only thing that relieved his pain.

The “against” team were full of hard facts and determination. They put up a worthy debate. They were a great group, but on points, they were just pipped to the post by the “for” team. Boundless passion and counter arguments won them the debate.

Well done Year 6. You showed great cooperation, communication and presentational skills.

Researching and discussing drugs

Year 6 put their debating skills to the test this afternoon! They have been researching and discussing drugs. It seems there is more to drugs than we initially thought. Medicines are drugs but are named as such to show that they are used for treating illnesses, but even they can be harmful. We discussed key words such as limits, overdoses, legal, illegal, recreational, depression, highs and prescriptions.

After researching types and adverse affects of drugs we discussed why some drugs are classed as illegal. Some children wanted to know why there were restrictions on drugs, when they help people get better.

An excellent point, which led us to playing out a scenario. This then led us to writing points FOR and AGAINST legalising a new drug. The class researched lots of key facts and began to write them up.

Today we shared some of our ideas and next week we hope to have a full debate on the matter.

Some of the key points made so far were:

Watch this space to find out which side wins…

Different forms of abuse

Following the assembly by the NSPCC last week, they returned to school to do a session with Year 6, considering different forms of abuse.

During the session, the children considered a variety of scenarios and justified their opinions whether they were: Always OK, Never OK or Sometimes OK.

Scenarios included:
• Keeping a secret
• Someone watches or touches a child when they don’t want them to
• A family member gives a child a kiss goodnight
• Someone send or shows a child an inappropriate film or message

The children realised that for all scenarios there are situations where they are OK and others where they are definitely Never OK, and showed excellent understanding of what to do if ever they encountered a situation where it was not OK.

They then progressed to considering a video of a child’s daily life – a child who was suffering from Neglect – showing real empathy for the boy (Guy) understanding the emotions he must feel and the challenges he faces in his life.

Fortunately, Guy sought out help calling the NSPCC and speaking to a trusted adult in school. He and his family got help and, in time, his life did get better.

Anti-Bullying Week: They never let me play!

Whenever I try to play they tell me to go away and call me names.” Sam aged 7.

How do you think Sam feels? What is his day like?

Year 6 started Monday morning by considering the effects of bullying.

Children discussed the above scenario, all contributing sensibly to the conversation.
He feels lonely because he doesn’t have anyone to play with.

He doesn’t like coming to school.

Sam might start to think that the names they are calling him are true.

He probably feels misunderstood.

He should:
– tell a trusted adult or friend
– don’t keep trying to play with them
– try to ignore them if they’re being horrible to him (but that’s not easy to do)

The children then progressed to discussing how others could help Sam and the importance of showing RESPECT in our daily lives.

Environmental issues

Having looked at democracy around the world Year 6 looked at the Earth as a whole. We focussed our discussions of the environmental issues affecting the Earth.

Eagles knew lots of issues that affect Earth like pollution and deforestation.
They then set about researching and noting some issues and what they were as well as how they affected us.

Lexi found that medical waste was a concern, as needles etc have to be disposed of.

Jamie found that agriculture polluted the waters and land causing animals to die.

Kaicee noted that noise pollution was also an issue and we discussed some of the different types: aeroplanes as well as cars.

Year 6 will continue with their research next week.

Red Cross: Refugees and asylum seekers

Year 6 were fortunate to welcome a visitor from the Red Cross this morning. The children learnt about refugees and asylum seekers: understanding what each term means and why people might become one.

The children shared their ideas confidently and showed great maturity in their answers, with some willing to share their own experiences.

What could make it unsafe to live in a country?

  • If someone is trying to take over control of the country.
  • If the country is at war.
  • Poverty, where people can’t even grow food to live on, let alone afford to buy food.
  • Severe pollution can damage people’s health.
  • Laws in certain countries can lead to people being persecuted for the beliefs, race or sexuality.
  • Weather: drought, hurricanes, volcanoes, fires. (there are now climate refugees who have to move from their own country because of changes in their environment).
  • Contagious diseases.
  • The difference between a refugee and an asylum seeker:

    “Asylum seekers are looking for a place to stay.”

    Asylum seekers are legally allowed to live in a country while their application to stay in the country is processed. If their application to stay in the country is granted, they become refugees.

    How might asylum seekers feel when they first come to a new country?

  • Scared / afraid – living somewhere new that they have no knowledge of.
  • Confused – not knowing the laws and cultures of the new country.
  • Lonely / isolated – having left their family and friends behind.
  • Excited – at the prospect of making a new, positive life.
  • In light of these discussions, the children then designed welcome packs for asylum seekers adding a well-reasoned variety of information that would enable them to adapt quickly into their new environment and to feel safe. All children worked collaboratively in developing the welcome packs and in presenting their excellent ideas to the class.

    How should we treat asylum seekers?

  • Make them feel welcome
  • Act as role models to other countries
  • Make them feel safe
  • Make sure they understand how to get around and where they need to go
  • Treat them with respect
  • Give them a home
  • Help them to have fun
  • Include them as part of the community
  • Ensure they have enough food
  • Help them to feel emotionally strong / treat them with sensitivity and compassion
  • A massive thank you to Anne-Marie for coming in to work with us; the children really enjoyed the session and have learnt a lot from it.